magpie, magpie

reblogs and stuff
flavors.me kaygarcia
elsewhere magpie

tsabe:

The Animated Self Portrait 

T.S Abe

such clean, unabashed attitude. Awesome.

(Source: tsabe.co.uk, via illustratedladies)

"Don’t take a nude pic if you’re a famous woman and don’t want it leaked."

mysharona1987:

"Don’t wear a hoodie if you don’t want to be mistaken for a criminal and shot."

"Don’t get drunk at a party if you don’t want to be sexually assaulted."

"Don’t argue with a cop if you don’t want to get killed."

"Don’t walk home by yourself if you don’t want to get raped."

Victim blaming 101: Everyone should live in fear from ever doing anything.

(via black-culture)

(Source: witstudio, via bigplanetcomics)

dynastylnoire:

-imaginarythoughts-:

hipsterlibertarian:

In July I shared a story of an incident in which my city’s police stormed a man’s house looking for drugs in the middle of the night and executed his two (understandably startled) dogs. One of the dogs was shot to death while fleeing in fear, and as I noted then, this isn’t an isolated incident. Just a few years ago, the Saint Paul Police killed another family dog…and forced handcuffed children to sit next to its bleeding corpse. The kicker? The raid wasn’t even in the right house!
Now, a new report has surfaced of SPPD brutality. This time, a young father named Chris Lollie was arrested while waiting to pick up his kids from school. The charges were “Trespassing, Disorderly Conduct, and Obstructing Legal Process,” and police claimed he refused to leave an area reserved for employees of the bank building he was in. However, not only were there no signs indicating that the location was private, but Lollie wasn’t even in the bank proper; he was in the skyway.
(For those who aren’t familiar with the skyway system, it’s a thing we have in St. Paul, Minneapolis, and some other Minnesota cities. Basically, it gets hella cold here in the winter, so they built enclosed sidewalks, or skyways, one or two stories up. In the downtown areas, the skyways form a whole second network of pedestrian roads, and once you get inside your office building—or whichever building is closest to your parking garage or bus stop or whatever—you can use them to move from building to building to get around the whole downtown area. It’s an easy way to go to lunch or meetings without having the snot in your nostrils freeze. I mention all that to say: Skyways are public spaces. You do not have to be an employee in the buildings they connect to use them. Lollie was not trespassing.)
Fortunately, Lollie had the presence of mind to capture his interaction with the SPPD on film. Here’s a transcript I’ve made of the first few seconds:

Lollie: So what’s your business with me right now?
Officer: I want to find out who you are, and what the problem was back there…
Lollie: There is no problem—that’s the thing.
Officer: So, talk to me, let me know, and you can be on your way.
Lollie: Let you know…why do I have to let you know who I am? Who I am isn’t the problem.
Officer: Because that’s what police do when they get called.
Lollie: Well, I know my rights, first off. Secondly, I don’t have to let you know who I am if I haven’t broken any laws. Like I told him, I’m going to New Horizons [School] to pick up my kids at 10 o’clock. I was sitting there for ten minutes…

As the officer brushes aside his explanation and continues to illegally demand he identify himself, Lollie cuts to the chase: “The problem is I’m black. That’s the problem. No, it really is, because I didn’t do anything wrong.”
Next, Lollie and the female officer he’s been walking and talking with meet a male officer. When Lollie politely asks the officer not to touch or obstruct him, because he has to go get his kids, the man immediately responds, “Well, you’re going to go to jail then.”
As the police initiate the arrest process—telling him to put his hand behind his back or “otherwise things are going to get ugly"—the camera visuals go black. Lollie continues to be heard pleading, still polite even while he’s assaulted, that he be allowed to go meet his children.
Next, they tase him.
If that’s not enough to convince you that this is gross police misconduct, seriously, take five minutes and watch the video. The calmness of his tone alone should make it obvious that there is no possible argument that the situation merited this kind of police action:

After multiple witnesses verified Lollie’s version of events, prosecutors dropped all charges against him. One woman who is also not an employee at the bank the skyway links noted that she regularly sits during her lunch break exactly where Lollie was sitting, but she has never been harassed by police. However, the SPPD continue to defend their actions.
At The Atlantic, Conor Friedersdorf points out how simple it would have been for police to resolve this situation without violence and an arrest had they cared to do so:

His story about getting his kids wasn’t merely plausible, given the man’s age and the fact that there was a school right there–it was a story the female police officer shown at the beginning of the video or the male officer shown later could easily confirm. 
Lollie is also absolutely correct that no law required him to show an ID to police officers. As Flex Your Rights explains, “Police can never compel you to identify yourself without reasonable suspicion to believe you’re involved in illegal activity,” and while 24 states have passed “stop and identify” statutes “requiring citizens to reveal their identity when officers have reasonable suspicion to believe criminal activity may be taking place,” Minnesota isn’t one of those states.

The female officer shown in the beginning of the video could easily have de-escalated the encounter by saying, “You’re right, sir, you have every right to refuse to show me identification, and if you’re just picking up your kids I’m so sorry to have bothered you. If you don’t mind, I just want to walk with you to confirm that your story checks out so I can inform the 911 caller of their error. That way we can make sure this never happens again when you’re just here to pick up your kids.”
Or she could’ve said, “Sir, I totally see why this is confusing–a lot of people would think so. Let me try to explain. That totally looks like a public seating area, but it’s actually private. Don’t you think they should have a sign saying so? Calling me may seem like an overreaction, but technically they can ask you to leave. You’re walking away now, so there’s actually no problem as long as you’re not going to go back. Are you? Okay, then we have no problem, have a wonderful day.”  

As Lollie is carried away post-tasing, he can be heard challenging the officers’ “legal” assault: "Who are you? You don’t rule me. I didn’t do anything wrong. I didn’t hurt anybody. I didn’t touch anybody." 
If only the SPPD could honestly say the same.

That video that was being passed around yesterday

boooooooooooooooooooooost

dynastylnoire:

-imaginarythoughts-:

hipsterlibertarian:

In July I shared a story of an incident in which my city’s police stormed a man’s house looking for drugs in the middle of the night and executed his two (understandably startled) dogs. One of the dogs was shot to death while fleeing in fear, and as I noted then, this isn’t an isolated incident. Just a few years ago, the Saint Paul Police killed another family dog…and forced handcuffed children to sit next to its bleeding corpse. The kicker? The raid wasn’t even in the right house!

Now, a new report has surfaced of SPPD brutality. This time, a young father named Chris Lollie was arrested while waiting to pick up his kids from school. The charges wereTrespassing, Disorderly Conduct, and Obstructing Legal Process,” and police claimed he refused to leave an area reserved for employees of the bank building he was in. However, not only were there no signs indicating that the location was private, but Lollie wasn’t even in the bank proper; he was in the skyway.

(For those who aren’t familiar with the skyway system, it’s a thing we have in St. Paul, Minneapolis, and some other Minnesota cities. Basically, it gets hella cold here in the winter, so they built enclosed sidewalks, or skyways, one or two stories up. In the downtown areas, the skyways form a whole second network of pedestrian roads, and once you get inside your office building—or whichever building is closest to your parking garage or bus stop or whatever—you can use them to move from building to building to get around the whole downtown area. It’s an easy way to go to lunch or meetings without having the snot in your nostrils freeze. I mention all that to say: Skyways are public spaces. You do not have to be an employee in the buildings they connect to use them. Lollie was not trespassing.)

Fortunately, Lollie had the presence of mind to capture his interaction with the SPPD on film. Here’s a transcript I’ve made of the first few seconds:

Lollie: So what’s your business with me right now?

Officer: I want to find out who you are, and what the problem was back there…

Lollie: There is no problem—that’s the thing.

Officer: So, talk to me, let me know, and you can be on your way.

Lollie: Let you know…why do I have to let you know who I am? Who I am isn’t the problem.

Officer: Because that’s what police do when they get called.

Lollie: Well, I know my rights, first off. Secondly, I don’t have to let you know who I am if I haven’t broken any laws. Like I told him, I’m going to New Horizons [School] to pick up my kids at 10 o’clock. I was sitting there for ten minutes…

As the officer brushes aside his explanation and continues to illegally demand he identify himself, Lollie cuts to the chase: “The problem is I’m black. That’s the problem. No, it really is, because I didn’t do anything wrong.”

Next, Lollie and the female officer he’s been walking and talking with meet a male officer. When Lollie politely asks the officer not to touch or obstruct him, because he has to go get his kids, the man immediately responds, “Well, you’re going to go to jail then.”

As the police initiate the arrest process—telling him to put his hand behind his back or “otherwise things are going to get ugly"—the camera visuals go black. Lollie continues to be heard pleading, still polite even while he’s assaulted, that he be allowed to go meet his children.

Next, they tase him.

If that’s not enough to convince you that this is gross police misconduct, seriously, take five minutes and watch the video. The calmness of his tone alone should make it obvious that there is no possible argument that the situation merited this kind of police action:

After multiple witnesses verified Lollie’s version of events, prosecutors dropped all charges against him. One woman who is also not an employee at the bank the skyway links noted that she regularly sits during her lunch break exactly where Lollie was sitting, but she has never been harassed by police. However, the SPPD continue to defend their actions.

At The Atlantic, Conor Friedersdorf points out how simple it would have been for police to resolve this situation without violence and an arrest had they cared to do so:

His story about getting his kids wasn’t merely plausible, given the man’s age and the fact that there was a school right there–it was a story the female police officer shown at the beginning of the video or the male officer shown later could easily confirm. 

Lollie is also absolutely correct that no law required him to show an ID to police officers. As Flex Your Rights explains, “Police can never compel you to identify yourself without reasonable suspicion to believe you’re involved in illegal activity,” and while 24 states have passed “stop and identify” statutes “requiring citizens to reveal their identity when officers have reasonable suspicion to believe criminal activity may be taking place,” Minnesota isn’t one of those states.

The female officer shown in the beginning of the video could easily have de-escalated the encounter by saying, “You’re right, sir, you have every right to refuse to show me identification, and if you’re just picking up your kids I’m so sorry to have bothered you. If you don’t mind, I just want to walk with you to confirm that your story checks out so I can inform the 911 caller of their error. That way we can make sure this never happens again when you’re just here to pick up your kids.”

Or she could’ve said, “Sir, I totally see why this is confusing–a lot of people would think so. Let me try to explain. That totally looks like a public seating area, but it’s actually private. Don’t you think they should have a sign saying so? Calling me may seem like an overreaction, but technically they can ask you to leave. You’re walking away now, so there’s actually no problem as long as you’re not going to go back. Are you? Okay, then we have no problem, have a wonderful day.”  

As Lollie is carried away post-tasing, he can be heard challenging the officers’ “legal” assault: "Who are you? You don’t rule me. I didn’t do anything wrong. I didn’t hurt anybody. I didn’t touch anybody."

If only the SPPD could honestly say the same.

That video that was being passed around yesterday

boooooooooooooooooooooost

(via fyeahcracker)

Ferguson is no longer a trending topic

sapphicnymph:

This should worry you. This fight is far from over, we can’t start strong and simply not finish

(via fyeahcracker)

Aug. 31 10:28 am

justice4mikebrown:

(via fyeahcracker)

cumberston-hiddlesbatch said: What are some comics you recommend that feature lesbians? I need some more lady lovin' reading material!

bigplanetcomics:

kateordie:

I am by no means an expert, but here are some I’ve enjoyed:

- Fun Home

- Dykes to Watch Out For

- Lumberjanes

- Blue is the Warmest Colour (Disclaimer: I haven’t read this, but I want to.)

- Dar (Although this comic is more about conflict of identity, I still really love and always recommend it, especially to people who lean more towards “queer” than anything else.)

- Batwoman: Elegy

- Young Avengers (There are so many queer characters in Young Avengers, especially in the newest run. Although there isn’t much on-panel lady-love, Miss America Chavez is a badass hero and I would kill to write her.)

- Sailor Moon

- Buffy

- Y: The Last Man

If you’re looking for some more… Ahem, ADULT material, I recommend the Smut Peddler books and Small Favors, if you can get your hands on it. 

Great list for graphic novels which feature queer women!  I’d also add The Legend of Bold Riley by Leia Weathington.

need to read all of the things

questionall:

bluenationreview:

Maybe that’s why Paul Ryan’s response to poverty is basically… meh… http://bit.ly/1uJG0T3

Yes, I think whenever one of these asshole politicians starts trying to say that the poor are lazy, we should point out the fact that they work 2 days a week and I’m pretty sure there is not much real work involved. Lots of kissing up and raising money and long dinners and being told what to do by the rich, but nothing truly worthwhile that helps anyone but themselves and the rich.

I don’t know what their work and “work” entails. Somehow I’ve never really looked into what any of them do in their districts/states. I know a lot is fluff, but in NPR’s interview this morning he made it sound like he does do some outreach, not that that’s a pass, partly because both things he referenced are religious (Christian) organizations. Anyway, from the interview:

On whether extra hurdles imply people in poverty aren’t trying hard enough
What I’m implying is you have to have accountability. It’s not a one-way street. With aid and support come some expectations. And I think hard-working taxpayers have every right to expect that their money that is going to this person is going to go to a good effect, and that it’s something that’s not endless.

To me this sounds as if he means personal accountability, not accountability in the system. There’s only so much a person can do against the world, against systemic, institutionalized issues in programs and just in how America functions. Then:

On criticism that the plan focuses too much on personal problems rather than larger economic issues
In one poverty plan, you’re not going to take down the entire macroeconomic policy world. The argument I make in this book is that we have to go toward more of a culture of inclusion. And, specifically with respect to people who are fighting poverty, I would argue, inadvertently, that we have marginalized the poor in many ways.

Uh, no shit. Also commented on in the interview, that Republicans ride on white votes. Ryan argued that the Repub party needs to stop seeking minority and women’s votes as a means to an end, and that they need to attract votes based on being a party of morals. Shudder.

On criticism that phrases he has used, such as “the culture of the inner city,” are racist
That’s just ridiculous. There wasn’t race in those comments, and race had nothing to do with it. What I was trying to talk about is the culture of work, is work ethic. And to try and reinvigorate and reintegrate people in work. In far too many ways in our communities we have isolated the poor, we have marginalized the poor, and we have to reintegrate people in our communities.

'We Republicans have been thinking and talking about poverty wrong. But guise! it totally wasn't racist to say “inner city culture of not working” I don't know where people came up with that idea lol.' Keep digging your pit.

questionall:

bluenationreview:

Maybe that’s why Paul Ryan’s response to poverty is basically… meh… http://bit.ly/1uJG0T3

Yes, I think whenever one of these asshole politicians starts trying to say that the poor are lazy, we should point out the fact that they work 2 days a week and I’m pretty sure there is not much real work involved. Lots of kissing up and raising money and long dinners and being told what to do by the rich, but nothing truly worthwhile that helps anyone but themselves and the rich.

I don’t know what their work and “work” entails. Somehow I’ve never really looked into what any of them do in their districts/states. I know a lot is fluff, but in NPR’s interview this morning he made it sound like he does do some outreach, not that that’s a pass, partly because both things he referenced are religious (Christian) organizations. Anyway, from the interview:

On whether extra hurdles imply people in poverty aren’t trying hard enough

What I’m implying is you have to have accountability. It’s not a one-way street. With aid and support come some expectations. And I think hard-working taxpayers have every right to expect that their money that is going to this person is going to go to a good effect, and that it’s something that’s not endless.

To me this sounds as if he means personal accountability, not accountability in the system. There’s only so much a person can do against the world, against systemic, institutionalized issues in programs and just in how America functions. Then:

On criticism that the plan focuses too much on personal problems rather than larger economic issues

In one poverty plan, you’re not going to take down the entire macroeconomic policy world. The argument I make in this book is that we have to go toward more of a culture of inclusion. And, specifically with respect to people who are fighting poverty, I would argue, inadvertently, that we have marginalized the poor in many ways.

Uh, no shit. Also commented on in the interview, that Republicans ride on white votes. Ryan argued that the Repub party needs to stop seeking minority and women’s votes as a means to an end, and that they need to attract votes based on being a party of morals. Shudder.

On criticism that phrases he has used, such as “the culture of the inner city,” are racist

That’s just ridiculous. There wasn’t race in those comments, and race had nothing to do with it. What I was trying to talk about is the culture of work, is work ethic. And to try and reinvigorate and reintegrate people in work. In far too many ways in our communities we have isolated the poor, we have marginalized the poor, and we have to reintegrate people in our communities.

'We Republicans have been thinking and talking about poverty wrong. But guise! it totally wasn't racist to say “inner city culture of not working” I don't know where people came up with that idea lol.' Keep digging your pit.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

“Today, the United States is No. 1 in billionaires, No. 1 in corporate profits, No. 1 in CEO salaries, NO. 1 in childhood poverty and NO. 1 in income and wealth inequality in the industrialized world.”

—   

Senator, Bernie Sanders. (via nzingasconquests)

CAN WE ADD INSTITUTIONALIZED AND BROADDAYLIGHT RACISM 

(via parisiansunrisemoroccanmoonlight)

(Source: curvesincolor, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

youcanfuckingbiteme:

Playing a Bethesda game like

image

They are very close to Washington, DC, after all.

(via koshersociety)